Posts tagged ‘rodenticide’

April 22, 2014

“Why the Fuss?” Explained

by jteaton

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“Why the Fuss?” Explained

First-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) were developed in the 1940s and are considered “multiple dose” rodenticides, because they typically require multiple feedings by a rodent over time to obtain a lethal dose. Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) were developed in response to resistance issues reported with the FGARs, primarily warfarin.  CA Department of Pesticide Regulation registered bromadiolone in 1982, brodifacoum in 1983, difethialone in 1997, and difenacoum in 2008. In general, SGARs are more acutely toxic than FGARs because they are designed to be lethal after a single feeding instead of after multiple doses. Since it takes several days for a rodent to die after feeding on an SGAR, rodents may feed on the SGAR bait multiple times before dying. As a result, rodent carcasses may contain residues of SGARs many times over the lethal dose. If a non-target predator feeds on a rodent carcass containing a lethal concentration of an SGAR, the non-target predator can also be impacted by the rodenticide.

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October 24, 2012

Fast-Acting Rodent Baits

by jteaton

Many times people think that fast-acting rodent bait means a larger amount of active ingredients, the “more is better” way of thinking. When it comes to rodenticides with an active ingredient like Bromethalin in our Top Gun™ Baits, this is not the case.
Top Gun™ Bait is a product that disrupts energy at a cellular level, causing the rodent to become weaker over a 48-hour period. In a poisoned rodent, fluid builds up around the nerves which results in paralysis and death.
The great thing about this type of bait is that the rodent begins to feel the effects within the first 12 hours or less, so it doesn’t feel like consuming more bait as with second generation anticoagulants where a rodent can feed up to 3 days. Less rodenticide in the blood and stomach of the rodent means less risk of secondary poisoning for non-targets. On average, a mouse can consume just 2.5 grams (a rat 7-8 grams) for a lethal dose; for the most part that’s just a single feeding.
When it comes to secondary poisoning, larger animal needs to consume large amounts of Top Gun™ Bait for a lethal effect. If a cat or dog consumes a dead rodent, they’re not likely to be poisoned. This is good news for the PMP whose customers are now demanding lower-risk products.
For more information, visit http://www.jteaton.com and review the label and MSDS sheets for our Top Gun™ baits.

James Rodriguez
Western Territory Manager
J.T. Eaton Co., Inc.
(818) 640-4587

May 20, 2011

EPA RMD Update

by jteaton

By now, most of us are familiar with the EPA’s Risk Mitigation Decision that was released in 2008. This post is to remind everyone that the deadline for bait changes is June 4. Before reminding everyone what that means, here is a recap of what the RMD entails for professionals and consumers. (This information is taken from the RMD publication. A link to the official document is below.)

Consumer Bait:
• Bait products must be sold with ready-to-use (one-time use or refillable) bait stations, except for products that are labeled solely for use outdoors, below-ground for control of moles and pocket gophers.
• Bait products may contain one or more of the following active ingredients: chlorophacinone, diphacinone, warfarin, bromethalin, cholecalciferol, and zinc phosphide.
• Meal, treated whole-grain, or pelleted forms of bait (whether packaged in placepacks or not) are prohibited, except for products that are labeled solely for use outdoors, below-ground for control of moles and pocket gophers.
• A retail package containing a bait station may contain up to a maximum of 1 pound of bait for either mouse or rat control (the 1 pound limit includes the initial bait placement inside the bait station, plus any bait refills).

Second Generation Bait:
• Second Generation bait for professional and agricultural use need not be sold in bait stations, but labels must require use of bait stations for indoor applications where children, domesticated animals, or non-target wildlife may be exposed.
• Product labels must require use of bait stations for all outdoor, aboveground placements.

Agricultural Use
• Any form of bait is acceptable, including meal, pelleted, and block forms.
• Product labels must state, “For use in and around agricultural buildings only. Do not apply further than 50 feet from agricultural buildings.”
• Product labels must state, “Do not use in homes or other human residences.”
• Products must contain at least 8 pounds of bait.

Professional Use
• Product labels must state “Do not apply further than 50 feet from buildings.”
• Bait stations used in residential and institutional settings must meet the standards set forth in Section V.C, below, for ability to isolate bait from children.
• Any form of bait except liquid is acceptable, including meal, pelleted, block, and paste forms.
• Products must contain at least 16 pounds of bait.

EPA believes that these size limits will effectively discourage residential users from obtaining second generation anticoagulants for their own use.

First Generation and Nonanticoagulant Bait:
• Other Bait for professional or agricultural use need not be sold in or with bait stations, but labels must require use of bait stations where children, domesticated animals, or non-target wildlife may be exposed (this is not a new requirement).
• Any form of bait is acceptable, including meal, pelleted, or block forms.
• Products must contain at least 4 pounds of bait.

**For products in packages with at least 8 but not more than 16 pounds of bait, labels must state that products may only be used in and around (within 50 feet) of agricultural buildings (e.g., barns, hen houses), and bear the statement “Do not use this product in homes or other human residences.”**

What does this mean? According to the EPA, June 4 is the last turning point for bait changes.
• Last day for voluntarily complying registrants to release into commerce a product not complying with the risk mitigation decision.
• Products requesting voluntarily cancellation have until this date to release into commerce.
• Existing stocks of non-compliant products released for shipment by the registrant on or before this date can be sold until stocks are exhausted.
• Non-conforming products released to retailers on or before June 4, 2011 may be sold until exhaustion.
• Products released to distributors or retailers post June 4, 2011 must include mitigation measures.

For more information and to view the complete RMD document, go to: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0955-0764